Engineering world health: Lessons learned from six years of undergraduate service-learning in the developing world

TitleEngineering world health: Lessons learned from six years of undergraduate service-learning in the developing world
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
AuthorsMalkin R
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
Date Published01/2008
Abstract

Engineering World Health is a fusion of engineers, scientists and physicians donating their time and talents to improve healthcare in disadvantaged areas around the world. The Duke University-Engineering World Health (Duke-EWH) Summer Institute is a unique study abroad program that offers engineering students an opportunity to receive hands-on technical skills in a foreign country. The summer begins with an intensive, four-week training session and ends with a four-week internship in a developing world hospital. Students install and repair equipment, train the staff, take inventory, solve problems and perform many other engineering duties at the hospital. Objective measures of success include the fact that the students have placed back into service over 1000 pieces of medical equipment in 23 of the world's poorest hospitals. Students in the program have gained over 30,000 hours of hands-on experience working with medical equipment in the clinical setting. With over 100 alumni of the program, Duke-EWH has amassed a significant amount of understanding of what works and what does not. For example, we now have a post-experience conference. We place students in pairs in developing world hospitals. Our training month now includes information on how to train across cultural and linguistic barriers. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2008.

Short TitleASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings